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fuorange discussion on - empyre -

RESEARCH TEAM
Kate Southworth
Patrick Simons
(Glorious Ninth)

DATE
April 2005

LINKS
research description
artwork description

paper description
artwork
paper (PDF)
discussion on -empyre-
presentation at Avit 05
outputs

KEYWORDS
bordercrossing, curatorial practice, conceptual art, new media art, criticism, transgressive, ethics, aesthetics, Matrix Theory, trans-subjectivity, ‘witness’, Bracha Ettinger, Glorious Ninth.

The invitation to participate in –empyre- presented an opportuntity for Kate Southworth and Patrick Simons (Glorious Ninth) to discuss their experimental collaborative methods of artworking. Informed by contemporary feminist theories of feminine aesthetics and ethics, their collaboration involves a process of relating to the other through a fragilization of self within a Matrixial sphere. Within Bracha Ettinger's Matrix Theory, borderlines, thresholds and limits are continually transgressed and dissolved, allowing new borderlines to emerge, to be crossed and to fade. Glorious Ninth’s work comes about through an inter-weaving of ethics and aesthetics. Aurally, visually and conceptually their pieces ebb and flow, and the elements within the pieces co-emerge and co-fade in ever-changing patterns that constantly shift focus.

Kate and Patrick have been working together on network art projects since 2000: each of them uses a variety of ethical, aesthetic, political, theoretical and conceptual approaches. Each draw on different theories and methodologies to make sense of the work produced individually and collaboratively. From the beginning of their collaboration, their intention was to work within a creative and critical space that valued an ability to consider and adjust to each others' thinking and emotions.

The space between Kate and Patrick’s different approaches is Glorious Ninth. They don't fuse together nor do they magnetically repel each other, rather they attempt to continually re-adjust their focus through different 'ways of knowing'.

 

From the introduction to Border Crossing discussion on -empyre-:

  "Do conceptual art and curatorial practice merge in post digital cultural production? How are new media art, criticism and curatorial practice a 'transgressive' ecology"?

This month, please join the artists' group Glorious Ninth (UK), together with InteractivA 05 artist/curator Raul Ferrara-Balanquet (MX) and new media artist/editor Eduardo Navas (US) as we consider cultural production as a border condition, ethically and aesthetically, locally and internationally, in simultaneously personal and public spaces.

We will trace crossovers and transgressions from the psychic space of internet art practice and psychoanalytic theory, to the social space of a local/international new media festival and back again.
We follow the impulse noted by Ryan Griffis in "subRational eRuptions" on <http://turbulence.org>, recalling the Frankfurt School theorists, to combine studies of unconscious or subliminal desire with economic realities in a provocative synthesis.

Join Glorious Ninth (UK) in a discussion of net art practice relative to Matrix Theory, a post-Lacanian theory of trans-subjectivity and 'witness' in the face of traumatic catastrophe, developed by Israeli-French artist and Bracha Ettinger, whose insights I first learned of on Jordan Crandall's UnderFire project, at Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art <http://www.wdw.nl/underfire-archive/>
Glorious Ninth writes, "Within Bracha Ettinger's Matrix Theory, borderlines, thresholds and limits are continually transgressed and dissolved, allowing new borderlines to emerge, to be crossed and to fade. Our work comes about through an inter-weaving of ethics and aesthetics. Aurally, visually and conceptually our pieces ebb and flow, and the elements within the pieces co-emerge and co-fade in ever-changing patterns that constantly shift focus." <http://gloriousninth.com>

Raul Ferrara-Balanquet and Eduardo Navas join Glorious Ninth to extend the conversation into a focus on public/ social space and cultural production in a post digital world...

Christina McPhee