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love_potion research description

AUTHOR
Kate Southworth
Patrick Simons
(glorious ninth)

DATE
2005 - 2007

LINKS
research description
artwork description
artwork

outputs

KEYWORDS
Alexander Galloway, Bracha Ettinger, counter-protocol, distributed artwork, DIY installation, Everyday performance, Matrix theory, Protocol: how control exists after decentralisation,

love_potion is a distributed artwork that pioneers the post-relational
concepts of 'durational everyday performance' and 'DIY Installation'. The work brings together aural-visual trans-narratives, fragile protocols and everyday performance. Components of the work have been developed and disseminated since July 2005, and the final version completed in November 2007. The final version is archived in the online artbase of New York’s Rhizome.

Accepting that there is no escape from protocol, love_potion offers
strategies of resistance that encourage everyday durational performances. These performances call for a fragilising and making vulnerable of the self, and create a potential for healing within that which Bracha Ettinger has termed the Matrixial sphere.

The first performance of love_potion was installed at the Port Eliot Literary Festival in July 2005, and a performative presentation of the work was delivered at the Association of Art Historians Annual Conference at The University of Leeds in 2006 as part of the ‘Challenge to Ocularcentrality’ panel. Further experiments in DIY installations arose from research undertaken into open source software and its relationship to contemporary art. A public talk on the subject was delivered at Tate St.Ives in September 2007. An artist’s talk on this work and two others that explore the relationship between protocol, narrative and Matrix theory was presented at the Challenges to Death conference in Dublin in November 2007.

As a direct result of making this work, new theories of counter-narrative and counter-protocol have been developed, expanding the existing understanding of these terms as defined by Mark Amerika and Alexander Galloway respectively, and proposing a co-poietic relationship between them. The research undertaken through the making of this work led to the conceptualisation of the Disrupting Narratives symposium at Tate Modern in 2007 which specifically explored the relationship between counter-narratives and counter-protocols.